CITIZENSHIP IN NATION: As Scouts fulfill the requirements for this merit badge, they will learn how to become active citizens are aware of and grateful for their liberties and rights, to participate in their governments and protect their freedom, helping to defend their country and standing up for individual rights on behalf of all its citizens.

Citizenship in the Nation merit badge requirements

1.Explain what citizenship in the nation means and what it takes to be a good citizen of this country. Discuss the rights, duties, and obligations of a responsible and active American citizen.
2.Do TWO of the following: a. Visit a place that is listed as a National Historic Landmark or that is on the National Register of Historic Places. Tell your counselor what you learned about the landmark or site and what you found interesting about it. b. Tour your state capitol building or the U.S. Capitol. Tell your counselor what you learned about the capitol, its function, and the history. c. Tour a federal facility. Explain to your counselor what you saw there and what you learned about its function in the local community and how it serves this nation. d. Choose a national monument that interests you. Using books, brochures, the Internet (with your parent's permission), and other resources, find out more about the monument. Tell your counselor what you learned, and explain why the monument is important to this country's citizens.
3.Watch the national evening news five days in a row OR read the front page of a major daily newspaper five days in a row. Discuss the national issues you learned about with your counselor. Choose one of the issues and explain how it affects you and your family.
4.Discuss each of the following documents with your counselor. Tell your counselor how you feel life in the United States might be different without each one. a. Declaration of Independence b. Preamble to the Constitution c. The Constitution d. Bill of Rights e. Amendments to the Constitution
5.List the six functions of government as noted in the preamble to the Constitution. Discuss with your counselor how these functions affect your family and local community.
6.With your counselor's approval, choose a speech of national historical importance. Find out about the author, and tell your counselor about the person who gave the speech. Explain the importance of the speech at the time it was given, and tell how it applies to American citizens today. Choose a sentence or two from the speech that has significant meaning to you, and tell your counselor why.
7.Name the three branches of our federal government and explain to your counselor their functions. Explain how citizens are involved in each branch. For each branch of government, explain the importance of the system of checks and balances.
8.Name your two senators and the member of Congress from your congressional district. Write a letter about a national issue and send it to one of these elected officials, sharing your view with him or her. Show your letter and any response you receive to your counselor.

CYCLING: Since 1911, hundreds of thousands of Scouts have made the most of their two-wheel adventures by earning the Cycling merit badge. Whether you just got your first bicycle or have been cycling for years, you will learn more about your bike and what it can do by working on the requirements for this badge.

Cycling merit badge requirements

1.Do the following: a. Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards you may encounter while participating in cycling activities and what you should do to anticipate, help prevent, mitigate, and respond to these hazards. b. Show that you know first aid for injuries or illnesses that could occur while cycling, including cuts, scratches, blisters, sunburn, heat exhaustion, heatstroke, hypothermia, dehydration, insect stings, tick bites, and snakebite. Explain to your counselor why you should be able to identify the poisonous plants and poisonous animals that are found in your area. c. Explain the importance of wearing a properly sized and fitted helmet while cycling, and of wearing the right clothing for the weather. Know the BSA Bike Safety Guidelines.
2.Clean and adjust a bicycle. Prepare it for inspection using a bicycle safety checklist. Be sure the bicycle meets local laws.
3.Show your bicycle to your counselor for inspection. Point out the adjustments or repairs you have made. Do the following: a. Show all points that need oiling regularly. b. Show points that should be checked regularly to make sure the bicycle is safe to ride. c. Show how to adjust brakes, seat level and height, and steering tube.
4.Describe how to brake safely with foot brakes and with hand brakes.
5.Show how to repair a flat by removing the tire, replacing or patching the tube, and remounting the tire.
6.Describe your state and local traffic laws for bicycles. Compare them with motor-vehicle laws.
7.Using the BSA buddy system, complete all of the requirements for ONE of the following options: road biking OR mountain biking. A. Road Biking (a) Take a road test with your counselor and demonstrate the following: (1) Properly mount, pedal, and brake, including emergency stops. (2) On an urban street with light traffic, properly execute a left turn from the center of the street; also demonstrate an alternate left-turn technique used during periods of heavy traffic. (3) Properly execute a right turn. (4) Demonstrate appropriate actions at a right-turn-only lane when you are continuing straight. (5) Show proper curbside and road-edge riding.Show how to ride safely along a row of parked cars. (6) Cross railroad tracks properly. (b) Avoiding main highways, take two rides of 10 miles each, two rides of 15 miles each, and two rides of 25 miles each. You must make a report of the rides taken. List dates for the routes traveled, and interesting things seen. (c) After completing requirement b for the road biking option, do ONE of the following: (1) Lay out on a road map a 50-mile trip. Stay away from main highways. Using your map, make this ride in eight hours. (2) Participate in an organized bike tour of at least 50 miles. Make this ride in eight hours. Afterward, use the tour’s cue sheet to make a map of the ride. B. Mountain Biking (a) Take a trail ride with your counselor and demonstrate the following: (1) Properly mount, pedal, and brake, including emergency stops. (2) Show shifting skills as applicable to climbs and obstacles. (3) Show proper trail etiquette to hikers and other cyclists, including when to yield the right-of-way. (4) Show proper technique for riding up and down hills. (5) Demonstrate how to correctly cross an obstacle by either going over the obstacle on your bike or dismounting your bike and crossing over or around the obstacle. (6) Cross rocks, gravel, and roots properly. (b) Describe the rules of trail riding, including how to know when a trail is unsuitable for riding. (c) On trails approved by your counselor, take two rides of 2 miles each, two rides of 5 miles each, and two rides of 8 miles each. You must make a report of the rides taken. List dates for the routes traveled, and interesting things seen. (d) After fulfilling the previous requirement, lay out on a trail map a 22-mile trip. You may include multiple trail systems, if needed. Stay away from main highways. Using your map, make this ride in six hours.
## The bicycle must have all required safety features. It must be registered as required by your local traffic laws.